Extremely Affordable Health Innovations and World Health Care Congress
Wednesday, April 22, 2009
The "Extremely Affordable Health Innovations" Poster Session, organized and sponsored by the 6th Annual World Health Care Congress with support from Grameen Health, will serve as a platform for innovative organizations involved in developing or implementing extremely affordable solutions in health care delivery. These organizations will showcase the technologies and business processes they have developed, or are in the process of developing, to the Congress. Six organizations will be chosen to deliver an oral presentation to the full congress.

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Monday, April 13, 2009
Nobel Prize Winner Professor Muhammad Yunus Leading Delegation From Bangladesh to World Health Care Congress to Advance Affordable Health Care Innovations
Health Care innovations and opportunities attract attendees from more than 35 countries and delegations from over 12 to the 6th Annual World Health Care Congress April 14-16, 2009, Washington, D.C.

Washington D.C – March 30, 2009 – Professor Muhammad Yunus of the Grameen Bank and a delegation of 12 leaders from Bangladesh will be joining delegations from more than a dozen other countries at the 6th Annual World Health Care Congress, April 14-16, Washington, D.C.

Professor Yunus, a 2006 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate will be speaking at the conference regarding the Grameen Healthcare initiative, a program to develop a world-class, sustainable health care network to serve the people of Bangladesh. "A vital component of our health programs is the accompanying micro-health insurance program to encourage positive health seeking practices. This serves a dual purpose of enhancing utilization of health services and improving cost-recovery to achieve sustainability," states Professor Yunus. "While initial evaluations of the Grameen Clinic network and its health impact are positive, continuous improvements in coverage, disease prevention, quality of care and sustainability remain as top priorities."

The Bangladeshi delegation will be joined by others who will represent the spectrum of foreign health care leaders, from health ministries to hospitals, medical research facilities, pharmaceuticals and media outlets. This year’s congress will feature delegations from: China, India, Israel, Romania, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Sweden, South Africa, Poland, Germany, France, Czech Republic, Denmark, Canada, and Nigeria. Representatives from more than 35 other countries are also registered. Countries such as China also will be represented with pavilions that highlight companies that are shaping the future of health care delivery in their home countries.

“The World Health Care Congress is a truly international event, and our international participation continues to grow,” said Nicole Garratt, World Health Care Congress president and director. “We strongly encourage everyone to join the global discussion concerning health care. It’s exciting to see one conference connect all points on the globe through health care thought leadership and new business opportunities.” As one of its features, the 6th Annual World Health Care Congress will offer a roster of foreign speakers for a two-day International Health Summit, with topics including:

Game changing innovations in developing countries that improve the cost and quality of care
Global health's major killers and new medical research efforts
Advancing the Electronic Medical Record - UK's lessons learned to improve physician compliance and quality
International partnerships for health care delivery innovation
Lessons learned from global hospital and health system shared experiences and best practices
Responses to world public health challenges

About Grameen Healthcare
Grameen Healthcare aims to establish a sustainable health system in Bangladesh that will serve the health needs of all Bangladeshis income levels with low cost and high quality health care. Grameen Healthcare will design low-cost, affordable health services for all of Bangladesh, especially the lowest income women and children, and sustain these services thru social business. In addition to existing social business partnerships with Danone and Veolia, Grameen Healthcare has recently announced partnerships with Pfizer, GE Healthcare, and the Mayo Clinic. Grameen Healthcare continues to gather more new and innovative partners committed to harness best practices to build sustainable business models that can meet the unmet health needs of the poor in Bangladesh.

About Grameen Bank Grameen Bank (GB) has reversed conventional banking practice by removing the need for collateral and created a banking system based on mutual trust, accountability, participation and creativity. GB provides credit to the poorest of the poor in rural Bangladesh, without any collateral. At GB, credit is a cost effective weapon to fight poverty and it serves as a catalyst in the over all development of socio-economic conditions of the poor who have been kept outside the banking orbit on the grounds that they are poor and hence not bankable. As of January, 2009, it has 7.71 million borrowers, 97 percent of whom are women. With 2,541 branches, GB provides services in 83,744 villages, covering almost 100 percent of the total villages in Bangladesh. Grameen Bank was jointly awarded the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize with its founder Dr. Muhammad Yunus. See www.grameen.com <http://www.grameen.com/> for additional information.

About the World Health Care Congress
The 6th Annual World Health Care Congress is the most prestigious meeting of chief and senior executives from all sectors of health care. The 2009 conference will convene over 1,700 CEOs, senior executives and government officials from the nation's largest employers, hospitals, health systems, health plans, pharmaceutical and biotech companies, and leading government agency policy makers. For more information visit www.worldhealthcarecongress


Grameen Health to Establish Independent Collaborations with Pfizer
Grameen Health to Establish Independent Collaborations with Pfizer, GE Healthcare, and Mayo Clinic to Create Sustainable Healthcare Delivery Models for the Developing World Partnerships

Will Support Development of Business Models That Meet the Health Needs of 4 Billion People Around the World Who Live on Annual Incomes of Less Than $3,000.

BOSTON--(Business Wire)--

Grameen Health, an affiliate of Grameen Bank, the pioneering micro-financing organization in Bangladesh that shared the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006 for its work to alleviate poverty, announced today that it will establish independent partnerships with Pfizer Inc., GE Healthcare, and Mayo Clinic to create sustainable models for healthcare delivery in the developing world.

Grameen Health has chosen to work independently with these partners because of their respective expertise: Pfizer Inc is the world's largest research-based pharmaceutical company, GE Healthcare is the world's largest manufacturer of medical devices such as ultrasound and CT/MRI, and Mayo Clinic is the world's first and largest integrated, not-for-profit group practice.

These multiple, independent collaborations will focus on social business models in which the businesses are self-supporting and any profits are re-invested into the system in order to reach more of the poor. This approach is cost-effective and maximizes the benefits that patients receive. The models will be transferable to other healthcare delivery systems.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), among the biggest obstacles to improved health outcomes are inadequate health delivery and financing mechanisms that place the heaviest burden on the poor and sick, who are the least able to pay.

The independent collaborations will initially explore and evaluate ways to improve the existing Grameen Health delivery and financing systems in Bangladesh, with the aim of creating models that can be adapted for the needs of the 4 billion people around the world whose annual income is less than $3,000.

"As we address the challenges of global health access, we are pleased to partner with these and other organizations that share our belief that solutions to improving access to medicines and healthcare can be socially responsible and sustainable, yet commercially viable," said Professor Muhammad Yunus, who shared the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize with Grameen Bank, which he founded and now directs. "In Bangladesh, we have found that only an economically viable solution can create the infrastructure needed to enable people to sustain themselves, alleviating the poverty cycle. We believe our knowledge and expertise in micro-financing can be applied toward the development of a sustainable health care system."

During the next year, the collaborations will focus on the following areas:

-- Implementing primary health promotion and disease prevention programs. These are the most cost-effective steps in affordable health care, and include maternal and child health promotion and nutrition programs.

-- Analyzing ways to expand and improve the current low-cost micro-health delivery and insurance programs at Grameen Health's 38 existing Kalyan clinics.

-- Developing continuous training programs for nurses, technicians and physicians.

-- Reviewing operating efficiencies and scope of services (e.g., telemedicine, mobile health care) at Grameen Health's Kalyan clinics.

-- Introducing genomic, epidemiological, and outcomes research capability for the prevention and treatment of diseases relevant to the population in Bangladesh, with an emphasis on the best use of existing tested and approved procedures and drugs.

Grameen Health and its partners hope to develop appropriate and sustainable models for healthcare delivery and rural primary care clinics, with the goal of replicating these models in other countries. Pfizer is dedicating key employees to provide technical and advisory support to evaluate Grameen's existing healthcare delivery systems in Bangladesh. GE Healthcare will test delivery of ultrasound capability in rural clinics for early detection of abnormalities, and Mayo Clinic will work to improve the training, efficiency, and retention of staff at existing Grameen Health Kalyan clinics.

"Pfizer is honored to work with Grameen to explore the development of nonconventional, efficient and sustainable health financing and delivery models. We believe Grameen's world-renowned success in providing innovative financial solutions for the poor, coupled with Pfizer's health care experience, human capital and extensive arsenal of medicines, has the potential to improve the lives of millions of patients," said Jean-Michel Halfon, Area President of Canada, Latin America, Africa, and Middle East pharmaceutical operations, Pfizer Inc.

"GE Healthcare is committed to early health initiatives," said Omar Ishrak, President and Chief Executive Officer, Clinical Systems, GE Healthcare. "We have affordable technology with advanced imaging and care capabilities that can make a difference to save lives. With the ubiquitous usage of ultrasound, GE believes it's provided a crucial tool in the early care of expectant mothers. We intend to work with Grameen Health to further understand and expand ultrasound usage in rural areas. Through this pilot program we plan to train providers in the usage of ultrasound, evaluate the product, the training and the workflow that would be needed to enable the full deployment of this technology. This is one positive step towards accessible and sustainable healthcare for the developing world."

"Mayo Clinic and Grameen are exploring opportunities where our organizations can work collaboratively based on the junction of our missions and strategic priorities," said Denis Cortese, M.D., president & CEO, Mayo Clinic. "These opportunities range from new methods of delivering care and dissemination of knowledge and best practices to education, clinical research and the use of new technology in non-traditional settings. Our two organizations are working diligently to find the opportunities that will have the best likelihood of improving health care delivery in developing countries."

Professor Yunus adds: "Improving health care access and quality worldwide is a huge and long-term project. We would like to invite other partners and thought leaders to join in on the collaboration with Grameen Health, or to create their own social health care business models and share the results with us."

Grameen Health
Shadab Mahmud, 617-953-1665
Manager, Grameen Health
shadab.mahmud@gmail.com

Copyright Business Wire 2008




Extremely affordable health innovations at World Health Care Congress, April 14-16, Washington
Released:3/13/2009

The "Extremely affordable Health Innovations" Poster Session, organized and sponsored by the 6th Annual World Health Care Congress with support from Grameen Health, will serve as a platform for innovative organizations involved in developing or implementing extremely affordable solutions in health care delivery. These organizations will showcase the technologies and business processes they have developed, or are in the process of developing, to the Congress. Six organizations will be chosen to deliver an oral presentation to the full congress.

Examples of what you'll see:

-$25 incubator
Embrace is a nonprofit organization that aims to help the millions of vulnerable babies born every year in developing countries through a low cost infant incubator. Unlike traditional incubators that cost up to $20,000, the Embrace infant warmer costs $25. The device requires no electricity, has no moving parts, is portable and is safe and intuitive to use. It is designed to help 20 million vulnerable babies born across the globe each year.

-An incutabor made from car parts
The "Car Part" incubator functions as a neo-natal incubator, warming table, and blanket warmer. Automotive parts, available throughout the world, are capable of being repurposed to produce heat, light air, convection, a power reservoir, and auditory and visual alarms. The CIMIT Global Health Initiative and Design that Matters aim to price the incubator at $1,000 or 3 percent of the cost of the current top-of-the-line incubator in America.

-$25 cataract surgery
Using innovative managerial procedures such as allowing surgeons to continuously alternate between two operating tables and moving all non-surgical responsibilities to support staff, Aravind Eye Hospital in India averages nearly 50,000 surgeries per year. The high volume of quality care had enabled Aravind to dramatically reduce cost. Aravind hosts four to five percent of India's ophthalmic proc edures, although the facilities represent less than one percent of the country's ophthalmic manpower.

-$2,000 heart bypass surgery
Narayana Hrudayalaya Cardiac Hospitals in Bangalore, India can do high quality heart bypass operations for $2,000 for adults and $2,700 for young children, or about one-third to one-half of what equally good quality hospitals in India charge. Similar operations in the US cost $100,000 or more, but the outcomes and the infection rates are equally good or better with Narayana Hrudayalaya.

-Affordable, sustainable mobile health delivery
ClickHealth addresses two main health care issues in developing countries: 1. Access to medical specialists in under-served regions; 2. Collection of real-time data for interventions in indications such as cancer, HIV/AIDS and maternal mortality. ClickHealth partners with ClickDiagnostics for turning mobile health solutions into rapidly scalable service models. The mobile-based telemedicine service is built around microcredit for health-workers and micro-health insurance for patients.

-Social Marketing and Franchising
Janani provides affordable spacing and limiting family planning methods through its three inter-linked networks of clinics, rural centers and pharmacies in the private sector at an average cost of $2.94 per couple. The network consists of 40 owned clinics and 104 franchisees branded as Surya Clinics, and 7,500 rural centers networked as Surya Health Promoters.

-Expanding markets for fortified rice
Ultra Rice offers a culturally relevant and customizable solution to micronutrient malnutrition. With a focus on sustainability and scalability, the Ultra Rice business model promotes local control and ownership. Low-cost adaptation of existing equipment creates incentives for participation along the supply chain and minimizing the incremental cost of fortification.

Innovations will cover a broad range of healthcare delivery domains including diagnostic technologies, health promotion, medical devices, and community outreach. Information for those interested in submitting an abstract is available at the following link: Posters in Innovation

Additional Exceptional Entries And Citizen's Nominations are Welcome: While the official deadline is passed, we will continue to welcome additional exceptional entries and citizen's nominations.

The project, organized by the World Health Care Congress, as part of its mission of highlighting innovation in health care, with the support of Grameen Health, a Bangladesh-based organization that aims to extend quality health care to the world's poorest citizens. Grameen Health was founded by Professor Muhammad Yunus, founder of Grameen Bank, a micro-lending organization that serves poor populations. Professor Yunus will be speaking at the World Health Care Congress and will be visiting the poster presentations.

Additional presenters include Dr. Devi Shetty, world renowned cardiologist and founder of Narayana Hrudayalaya, which is already the world's largest children's heart hospital, with plans to make the facility the world's largest medical city. Also speaking will be Scott Hillstrom, CEO of the HealthStore Foundation that operates the affordable health franchise called CFWShops in Kenya, and David Green, VP Ashoka on Radical Innovations for affordable, Quality Care.

Contact: Patrick Golden
patrick.golden@worldcongress.com
781-939-2511
World Health Care Congress